ENERGY & RESOURCES

We’re creating positive changes

For a long time we have been making more from less; it’s part of our heritage. We’re also busy turning waste into resources, sourcing food and materials in a responsible way and protecting natural resources. And because we want to become energy independent, we’re making the switch to renewable energy.

CLIMATE & ENERGY

To change everything, we need everyone

Tackling what has now become one of humanity’s biggest challenges is something we can all commit to – making sure that our children and their children will have a safe and prosperous future on this planet.

Get a brief history of climate change and learn what we all can do to take action.

Support a 100 %
clean energy future

Investing in renewable energy

Urgent action is needed to tackle climate change, which is why the IKEA Group is committed to producing as much renewable energy as it consumes in its operations by 2020.

Did you know IKEA Group will produce as much renewable energy as it consumes in its operations by 2020?

€2.1 billion for investment in wind and solar

Since 2009, IKEA Group has invested EUR 1.5 billion in renewable energy and has committed to invest another EUR 600 million. We have committed to own and operate 327 offsite wind turbines and have installed 700,000 solar panels on IKEA buildings.

We believe renewable energy is the power of the future

To help tackle dimate change, we want our operations to become energy independent. One of our goals is to produce as much renewable energy as we consume by 2020. We have already installed over 700.000 solar panels on our stores and buildings across the world, and we want to give our customers the same possibility for their homes.

We know our customers want to live more sustainably at home, and we also know our customers would like to cut their household electricity bills and generate clean energy.

Did you know solar panels can cut electricity bills by up to 50%?
Did you know LED uses up to 85% less energy than incandescent bulbs and last up to 20 years?

WOOD

We’re big fans of wood

We love wood because it’s durable, renewable and recyclable. As one of the largest users of wood in the retail sector, we always look for ways to use it wisely. Watch our films to learn about the work we do to protect and conserve this precious resource.

Clear standards for responsible forestry

Our IWAY Forestry Standard sets clear requirements for all wood used in IKEA products. This includes a ban on wood that has been illegally harvested from sources involved in forest-related social conflicts, or from High Conservation Value Forests. All suppliers must comply with the standard before they can start deliveries. We improve our relationships with suppliers with certification audits to check compliance.

Certifying forests together with WWF

We work with WWF and others to combat illegal logging and promote responsible timber trade. IKEA and WWF have worked together since 2002 to support credible forest certification. The work includes mapping and protecting High Conservation Value Forests to secure biological and social forest values. So far, we have helped to improve forest management in Europe and Asia, and contributed to increasing FSC® certified forest areas by around 35 million hectares (about the size of Germany) in the countries where we work together.

Making things right when things go wrong

Several years ago we discovered tropical hardwood fibres in some of our paper products. This is not in line with our standards. After a full investigation, we improved our internal procedures to make sure this couldn’t happen again.

Preventing the use of illegally logged walnut

Our forestry experts detected illegal logging of walnut in China about five years ago. So, we stopped using this wood in our products. As a result, the MOLGER bathroom series is now made of birch from certified forests.

Learn more about how we work with forestry

In addition to suppliers meeting our IWAY Forestry Standard, the volume of wood from more sustainable sources – recycled wood and wood from forests certified by the FSC® – increased to 50% in 2015. We are aiming for 100% by 2020. Visit the FSC® website to learn more about this effort

Reports & Downloads

Download The IWAY Forestry and Forest Stewardship Council® Standards (PDF)

Download the Sustainability Strategy, People & Planet Positive (PDF)


COTTON

We´re all-in for cotton from more sustainable sources

Since Sep 1 2015, all the cotton we use for IKEA products comes from more sustainable sources. This means that the cotton is either recycled, or grown with less water, chemical fertiliser and pesticide, while increasing profit margins for farmers.

We’re proud about our progress, but our journey to improve the cotton industry doesn’t end here. Through projects in our sourcing countries, we aim to further improve farmers’ profitability and reduce the environmental impact of cotton farming. By sharing our experiences with the wider industry, our long-term goal is to transform the entire cotton market.

Why more sustainable cotton matters

Cotton is one of our most important raw materials. You’ll find it in many IKEA products, from sofas and cushions to bed sheets and mattresses. Although we love working with cotton, we were uncomfortable with the fact that growing cotton in the conventional way is often harmful to the environment and the people involved.

When grown conventionally, cotton farming uses large amounts of chemicals and water. This practice often leads to significant health risks to farmers, soil erosion and water scarcity. It also leads to higher costs, and since most cotton is grown on small farms in developing countries, many farmers struggle to make a profit.

So, we decided to find a way to tackle these challenges and made a commitment to improve the cotton industry.

Taking action to transform the cotton industry

Over a decade ago, IKEA began taking steps to transform the way cotton is produced. Along with WWF and others, we helped set up the Better Cotton Initiative (BCI), which aims to make global cotton production better for the people who produce it, better for the environment it grows in and better for the sector’s future by developing Better Cotton as a sustainable mainstream commodity.

Since 2005, we have been working with WWF to make cotton farming more sustainable. Our work began with 500 farmers in Pakistan. In the beginning they were reluctant about the idea of changing their cultivation techniques. However after one year, the results were significant enough to inspire more farmers to join our projects in India and Pakistan.

Making a lasting impact

We’re pleased to have reached our 100% target, but we won’t stop there. IKEA is committed to creating positive change throughout the entire cotton industry. Our vision is that more sustainable cotton becomes a mainstream material - affordable and accessible to many people beyond our business. We are pleased to have reached this milestone, but we’re not stopping there. One of our main focus areas now is water.

Cotton from more sustainable sources

Of the total cotton we use in IKEA products, 18% is recycled cotton. The remaining 82% comes from these sources: Better Cotton: 69%, towards better cotton*, and other more sustainable cotton, such as the E3 program in the US: 13%.

In calendar year 2016, we used more than 131 000 MT of cotton.

* Towards better cotton is a standard developed by IKEA following the same principles and criteria as Better Cotton, on its way to become Better Cotton.

Becoming water positive

We at IKEA are committed to being water positive, using it as efficiently as possible and promoting water stewardship throughout and beyond our own sphere of operations and on into the wider world. Based on the WWF’s water stewardship model, we are working to reduce the impact of our own operations and our suppliers’ operation, supporting sustainable water management in river basins and increasing people’s access to clean water. And our work to become water positive focuses on cotton, because cotton is one of the most high-impact crops when it comes to water. We provide farmers with training on better water management practices, and establish community-based Water User Associations. This means farmers grow with less water, so more water can be diverted to other uses.

Learn more about how we work with cotton and our partnerships

Since Sep 1, 2015, all the cotton we use for IKEA products comes from more sustainable sources. This means that the cotton is grown with less water, chemical fertiliser and pesticide, while increasing profit margins for farmers.

Reports & Downloads

Read more about how we source cotton in Turkmenistan (PDF)

IKEA VIEW: Cotton (PDF)


WATER

Treating water with respect

Water is essential for life – but clean, fresh water is something of a luxury in some parts of the world. That is why water, both when it comes to quantity and quality, is an important issue for us and our suppliers. We work with others to contribute to improved water management in water stressed areas where we operate – to ensure that there is enough clean water for ecosystems, people and communities.

Working together to save water and energy in India

For some factories in Southern India, the only way to get enough water is by trucking it 50 km. Outdated machinery and a polluted water supply often make production even less energy and water efficient. Jansons, a textiles supplier based in Erode, southern India, was inspired by the IKEA People & Planet Positive strategy and started a partnership project to tackle the problem. Measures taken included a system to recycle wastewater for printing, a new dyeing process that uses less water and ensuring motors are only running when needed.

“Our processing factory is in an area of water and energy scarcity, which was a nightmare for us,” says Mr Thirukumar, Managing Director of Jansons Industries. “With support from IKEA, we saw the difference the project was making and we were motivated to look for more opportunities. With the commitment of our employees, so far we have saved over 285 MWh of energy, and 69 million litres of water.”

Thinking ahead: how to save water for the future

Over 23 million people in Bangladesh don’t have safe drinking water.

“I don’t want my children and grandchildren to be part of that statistic. I want to make sure my company doesn’t do anything that leaves future generations in trouble,” says Shah S Alam, managing director of Unilliance, an IKEA textiles supplier based in Bangladesh. He’s played an important role in the water projects IKEA has initiated at the company, and he’s pushing Unilliance to take part in even more ambitious projects to save water.

“When we started working with IKEA, we already had an effluent treatment plant to remove pollutants from our waste water before it returned to the environment. But IKEA suggested that we think of ways to reduce and reuse this waste water.

“For example, after some simple changes we now use waste water to cool our machinery. This saves us around 100 m3 of water every day – enough to fill 15 Olympic swimming pools a year!”

“In five to 10 years the laws in Bangladesh will change – everyone will have to reuse their waste water. Working with IKEA has put us ahead of the crowd, and our customers are noticing the difference,” he says.


WASTE

Recycling in the big, blue box

Our goal is to eliminate waste from our operations. By 2020, 90% of the waste from our own operations will be recycled or energy recovered, of which 80% of the waste from stores and distribution centres will be material recycled.

We strive for zero waste to landfill wherever possible in our store and other IKEA operations.

Bring your recycling to IKEA!

We want to make recycling as easy as possible, which is why we offer the possibility of recycling your waste in IKEA stores. Did you know that you can leave batteries and compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs at most IKEA stores?

Creating a circular economy

We are working towards a circular IKEA, where resources are used more efficiently in a cycle of repair, reuse and recycling. At many stores, customers can return unwanted IKEA furniture to be resold or donated to charity.

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2015, 89% of waste was recycled across our operations

VALUE, NOT WASTE

Thinking in circles

At IKEA, we always look for ways to make more from less. But to help our customers create a better life at home, in a world where resources are scarce, we have to up our game. We need to rethink everything from the materials we use, to how we power our stores, and how we can make our products live longer in a cycle of repair, reuse, and recycling.

Throughout our value chain, we aim to use renewable and recycled resources as efficiently as possible, to make sure that we create value rather than waste. And when you bring the products home, we want to help you make them live longer, or give them a new life when you no longer need them.

Doing things right from the start

To make the world a more sustainable place we have to begin somewhere. By planning for our products’ next life at the design stage, we get a head start. To make more from less, we also use materials that are renewable and recycled and from more sustainable sources. Our products must last as long as they are needed and be easy to care for, repair, reuse, reassemble, and recycle. The better we do this, the better for our customers and our planet.

Old materials, new surfaces. Call us cheap, but we don’t like throwing things away. We see waste for what it really is – a resource – and look for ways to use more recycled materials in our products. That’s why we created the REINSVOLL wardrobe door. It’s made of recycled wood covered with plastic foil made from recycled PET bottles. No new wood needed, and no new plastic made from oil. And although REINSVOLL is a sustainable choice, of course it doesn’t compromise on quality, design or price.

Pioneering kitchen fronts. REINSVOLL isn’t our first product made entirely from 100% recycled FSC(R) certified wood and PET-bottles. The KUNGSBACKA kitchen fronts, with their sleek design and anti-fingerprint surface, have the same origin.

Every year, about 100 billion PET water bottles are used worldwide but only 30% are recycled. By giving them a new life as foil for doors and kitchen fronts, we show that recycling is not only the right thing to do, it also results in beautiful new products.

No ordinary box. One person’s trash is another person’s treasure.

To us, the practical storage box KUGGIS, made from recycled PET plastic bottles, is one of those gems. Flexible, good looking and recyclable, it will be your best friend for storage – over and over again.

Did you know?

By August 2020, 100% of material in our plastic products will be renewable and/or recycled, representing around 40% of our total plastic use

Towards zero waste

At IKEA Group we have decided to eliminate waste from all our operations and to be energy independent by 2020. This is no small feat, but together with suppliers, partners and customers we have the goal within reach.

IKEA of Sweden is also working through the whole supply chain with suppliers and partners to produce and distribute our products in the most efficient way. This includes minimizing waste in our value chain, and turning it into a resource by using it to make new products.

Did you know?

In 2016, 89% of waste is recycled or energy recovered across our operations.

Did you know?

By 2020, 90% of the waste from our own operations will be recycled or energy recovered. 80% of the waste from our stores and distribution centers will be material recycled.

The beauty of broken glass. The glass used to produce the IKEA PS 2017 vase has a story to tell. Having been rejected in its first life due to bubbles or other defects, the broken glass is re-melted and mouth blown by skilled craftsmen into mass-produced items. Yet the character of each piece of glass lives on, bringing a unique mix of colours and patterns to each vase. By re-using the glass instead of discarding it as waste, we save on valuable and limited resources, while bringing extra character to your home.

Step on it. TÅNUM is hand-made, giving each rug its own individual beauty. And even better – we use recycled cotton from our own operations to make it. More than 90% of the material used is leftover fabric from bed linen production. When you step on a TÅNUM rug you leave a smaller environmental footprint.

Every year, about 100 billion PET water bottles are used worldwide but only 30% are recycled. By giving them a new life as foil for doors and kitchen fronts, we show that recycling is not only the right thing to do, it also results in beautiful new products.

Give things another chance

At IKEA we want our customers to love and care for our products as long as possible – and even if they don’t, we do. Across our network of stores we try smarter and more planet-friendly ways to prolong the life of our products. In Belgium for example, we offer our customers five options to give furniture a second life: selling old IKEA-furniture in the store, renewing it by repainting or reassembling, repairing by offering replacement parts, returning old furniture through our transport service and donating to social organisations.

On a global basis we offer all customers replacement parts, and most markets have mattress takeback initiatives where you can return your old mattress when buying a new one. Seize the opportunity to breathe new life into your old furniture or give it a new life in our care.